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68. Quote, Unquote…

20 May
68. Quote, Unquote…

A bunch of quotes I found cute, inspirational, educational or just downright well-written from some of the books I’ve been reading over the past few months, but which don’t quite earn themselves a full-on, solo review. Enjoy, and feel free to share some of your favourite quotes!

 ‘Bossypants,’ Tina Fey
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“It was always ‘Day 27’ of something in Beirut…”
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“This made no sense to me, probably because I speak English and have never had a head injury…”

Solar,’ Ian McEwan
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“Dizzy with fatigue, he began the journey staring through his smeared train window at suburban London’s miraculous combination of chaos and dullness…”
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A typically McEwan’esque cutting insight into the reflexively English middle-class psyche:

You don’t have to look at me to talk to me, he wanted to say, as he watched the traffic ahead, trying to predict the moment when he might seize the wheel. But even Beard found it difficult to criticise a man who was giving him a lift, his host in effect. Rather die or spend his life as a morose quadraplegic than be impolite…”
.

solar

“It was lovers he needed, not wives…”

On a character’s relationship with his father:

“They had never discussed feelings, and had no language for them now…”

Unto Death,’ Amos Oz
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“Eight o’clock. Tel Aviv is already boiling and steaming. As if the very buildings will soon evaporate in the heat. Before we built a city on this spot the sand dunes stretched right down to the sea. In other words, we came here and forced these two furious elements asunder. As if we poked our heads into the jaws of the sea and the desert. There are moments on hot summer days when I have a sudden feeling that the jaws are trying to snap shut again…”
Telaviv-City-Beach
Comet In Moominland,’ Tove Jansson
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My first ever Moomin book, (they managed to pass me by as a child: I was more of a Smurfs fan), has sweet, descriptive chapter headings, like 18th/19th century novels, and plenty of cute, Winnie-the-Pooh’esque moomin-the-moomins-7597262-175-194wordplay:
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“‘We’d better only take the windfalls,’ said Moomintroll, ‘because mamma makes jam from these.’ But they had to shake the tree a little so that there were some windfalls…”
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On a homemade flag:
“They looked at his flag. ‘The blue on the top is they sky,’ he went on, ‘and the blue underneath is the sea. The line inbetween them is a road, the dot on the left is me at the moment, and the dot on the right is me in the future…'”
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Intelligent Thought: science versus the intelligent design movement,’ ed. John Brockman
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“Francis Crick, one of the discoverers of the structure of DNA, once jokingly credited his colleague Leslie Orgel with ‘Orgel’s Second Rule’: Evolution is cleverer than you are…”
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“The main problem with the creationist doctrine was the copious evidence of poor design…”
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“In a November 2004 Gallup assessment of public opinion, only 35 percent of respondents {in the USA} agreed with the statement that ‘the theory of evolution is a scientific theory well supported by the evidence.’ A few years earlier, another Gallup poll found 45 percent of the population in agreement that ‘God created humans pretty much in their present form at one time within the last 10,000 years’…”
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Ironically, almost the entire series of essays could have been replaced by the only Appendix: the ‘Memorandum Opinion of the United States District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania,’ in their complete and detailed refusal to accept Intelligent Design as science, epitomised by the following extract:
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“To be sure, Darwin’s scientific theory cannot yet render an explanation on every point should not be used as a pretext to thrust an untestable alternative hypothesis grounded in religion into the science classroom or to misrepresent well-established scientific propositions…”
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Darwin's sketch which first hinted at his theory of natural selection

Darwin’s sketch which first hinted at his theory of natural selection

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Planet Google: one company’s audacious plan to organize everything we know,’ Randall Stross
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A slightly outdated, but still interesting, look at the founding of the company which is soon to own all of our souls…
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“By 2006, data centers already consumed more power in the United States than did television sets…”
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There were echoes of the David Bellios book I read recently on translation:
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“Using multilingual documents prepared by the United Nations as the training corpus, Google fed its algorithm 200 billion words and let the software figure out matching patterns between pairs of languages. The results were revelatory. Without being able to read Chinese characters or Arabic script, without knowing anything at all about Chinese or Arabic morphology, semantics, or syntax, Google’s English-speaking programmers came up with a self-teaching algorithm that could produce accurate, and sometimes astoundingly fluid, translations…”
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“The historic first YouTube video was an eighteen-second segment of [co-founder Jawed] Karim standing in front of a pen of elephants at a zoo, explaining with a self-mocking wink how elephants have ‘really, really, really long trunks’…”
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When this somehow failed to go viral and spark the site, soon afterwards:
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“…they decided to try a desperate measure: they would run an advertisement on Craigslist in the Los Angeles area, inviting ‘attractive’ women to upload videos of themselves. The enticement would be a payment of $100 upon submission of every ten videos. This, too, ended in failure. The advertisement drew not a single response…”
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Co-founder of Google Sergey Brin knew what people would first use GoogleMaps for, just as teachers know that new language students will immediately use their dictionaries to look up rude foreign words:
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“Anyone who took the trouble to install the software could zoom to any destination on the globe, but the one place that most users wanted to see first was their own home. (Brin had anticipated that this would be the case when he had given each of his colleagues a quick visit to their homes, one by one, when he had provided them with a demonstration of Keyhole’s software the year before)…”
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Google+Earth
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The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind,’ William Kamkwamba w/Bryan Mealer
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“The Chichewa language even has a word, nkhuli, which means ‘a great hunger for meat’…”
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“I had the appetite of a fat politician…”
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“In the villages where health care is poor, many children die early of malnutrition, malaria, or diarrhea. In hungry times, the situation is always worse. Because of this, names often reflect the circumstances of the parents’ greatest fears. It’s quite sad, but all across Malawi, you run into men and women named such things as Simkhalitsa (I’m Dying Anyway), Malazani (Finish Me Off), Maliro (Funeral), Manda (Tombstone), or Phelantuni (Kill Me Quick) – all of whom had fortunately outwitted their unfortunate names. Many change their names once they’re older, like my father’s oldest brother. My grandparents named him Mdzimange, which means ‘Suicide’…”
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Why do I support the charity Room to Read, arranging fund-raisers in many countries I live in and providing scholarships to friends for their wedding presents instead of toasters? William has the answer:
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“To think my journey had begun in my tiny library at Wimbe – its three shelves of books like my entire universe…”
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And amongst all the other things this led to, (most famously, a TED talk which led to the creation of this excellent book), he also appeared on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart! What a guy…
 
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1 Comment

Posted by on May 20, 2013 in BOOKS

 

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