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98. Books Bought & Read, December 2013…

08 Jan
98. Books Bought & Read, December 2013…

Books Bought, December 2013

A Mathematician Plays The Market,’ John Allen Paulos

Lisbon In Pessoa: a tour and literary guide of the portuguese capital,’ João Correia Filho

Cartas Da Inglaterra’, (Letters From England), Eça de Queirós

Sobre A Republica,’ (On The Republic),  Fernando Pessoa

sandman-a-casa-de-bonecas-neil-gaiman-ed-conrad_MLB-O-209536732_6427

Portuguese language ‘Sandman‘ comic

De Port Said A Suez,’ (From Port Said To Suez), Eça de Queirós 

Sandman,’ (Portuguese Version, 30 copies) Neil Gaiman

O Mandarim,’ (The Mandarin), Eça de Queirós 

Os Lusíadas: contados ás crianças e lembrados ao povo,’ (The Lusiads: as told to children, and remembered to the people), Luís de Camões

Poemas Inglesas,’ (English Poems), Fernando Pessoa

Citações E Pensamentos De Fernando Pessoa,’ (Quotations And Thoughts Of Fernando Pessoa), Fernando Pessoa 

Autos,’ (Acts), Gil Vicente

O Arco De Sant’ana,’ (The Arch Of St.Anna), Almeida Garrett

O Templo Do Sol,’ (The Temple Of The Sun), Hergé

Herzog,’ Saul Bellow 

The Comfort Of Strangers,’ Ian McEwan

Quartéis De Inverno’, (Winter Quarters), Osvaldo Soriano

A Concise History Of Portugal,’ David Birmingham

The Penguin Book Of English Short Stories,’ ed.Christopher Dolley

As Origens Do Portugal: história contada a uma criança, (The Origins Of Portugal: history as told to a young child), Rômulo Do Carvalho 

A Lenda De São Julião Hospitaleiro de Flaubert,’ (Illustrations for Flaubert’s ‘The Legend Of St.Julian The Hospitaller’), Amadeo de Souza-Cardoso

Alice No País Das Maravilhas,’ (Alice In Wonderland), Lewis Carroll

Gilbert And Sullivan: the story of the partnership,’ Hesketh Pearson

 

Books Read, December 2013

Skullduggery Pleasant: playing with fire,’ Derek Landy

A Mathematician Plays The Market,’ John Allen Paulos

Tale Of A Tub,’ Jonathan Swift

1Q84,’ Murakami Haruki 

Lisbon In Pessoa: a tour and literary guide of the portuguese capital,’ João Correia Filho

Os Lusíadas: contados ás crianças e lembrados ao povo,’ (The Lusiads: as told to children, and remembered to the people), Luís de Camões

Poemas Inglesas,’ (English Poems), Fernando Pessoa

A Concise History Of Portugal,’ David Birmingham

 

This throwback blog to last year rounds off my books bought and read for 2013. (Last year!! Just a few days ago it was 2013, today it’s 2014…at this rate, it’ll be 2032 by March!): 22 bought, eight read, and a whole new language embarked upon.

Yes, the eagle-eyed amongst you, (and the human-eyed who read the lists and can spot a foreign language when you see one), will have noticed that the majority of books in both sections were in Portuguese, (or, as I like to think of it, drunken Spanish). I have been happily holed up in historical Lisbon for just over a month now, living in the back of a yoga studio by a park named after an early 20th century British King, and loving every minute of every hilly walk and pastel-fuelled café-based reading session.

(For those of you who don’t know, a pastel de nata is a Portuguese custard tart, small, sweet and so delicious it was voted one of the top fifty foods IN THE WORLD by The Guardian newspaper. Needless to say I am addicted to these little devils, topped with powdered sugar and cinnamon, especially the original ones from the 1837 shop in the suburb of Belém).

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World-famous ‘Pastéis de Belém’ custard tarts, Lisbon.
(Photo taken by the author;
pastéis, covered in powdered sugar and cinnamon, eaten by the author).

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My spoken skills are far for keeping up with my reading prowess, which makes it awkward when buying Portuguese books here whilst barely being able to ask how much they are in the local lingo: shopkeepers occasionally feel the need to make sure I understand that the books are not in English, which can get a little frustrating, but the good news is that one of all-time favourite writers is now available to me in his native tongue, (José Saramago, as featured in my Top 10 Authors blog here), and of the two new authors recommended to me upon arrival, one was so much fun he prompted an immediate blog two weeks ago, and the other, Fernando Pessoa, became my all-time favourite author before I’d even read any of his work, for reasons which will be made clear in an upcoming blog.

Author Fernando Pessoa in tile form, Lisbon

Author Fernando Pessoa in tile form, Lisbon

As happened two years ago when I landed in London, (and detailed in the February 2012 edition of this blog), much of my reading around this time will be Lisbon- and Portugal-based history, with some Portuguese literature thrown in for fun, since this week sees my début as a tour guide in Europe’s safest capital city.

Come join me, you’ll learn which city is not only the second oldest capital in Europe, but also the cheapest capital in Western Europe! (Hint: it’s Lisbon)

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1 Comment

Posted by on January 8, 2014 in BOOKS

 

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One response to “98. Books Bought & Read, December 2013…

  1. nycavri

    January 9, 2014 at 3:40 pm

    My December 2013 reading:

    Wake Up To Murder – Day Keene
    Sandman Slim – Richard Kadrey
    Something Wicked This Way Comes – Ray Bradbury
    Ralph 124C 41+ – Hugo Gernsback
    Kell’s Legend – Andy Remick
    The Comedy is Finished – Donald E Westlake

    The highlight was undoubtedly the Gernsbach thing – 100 year old SciFi, with more accurate predictions than not, and a fun little space adventure yarn thrown in. Great stuff from Singularity & Co. who are “rescuing” long out of print SciFi (and Adventure) novels to eBook.

    Keene continues to be a great go-to pulp name, and I’m hopeful of Westlake’s Estate finding *yet another* lost novel – “Comedy” was finished in the early-80s, but shelved when “King of Comedy” hit movie theaters for fear people would think it was an imitator!

    “Kell’s Legend” may be the worst thing I’ve read in a long, long time. An example – he tells you there are 3 people being attacked by enemies, describes two in some detail. Wanna guess who is dead before the end of the page?

    And that doesn’t get into Deus Ex Machina being how *every* *single* *battle* ends . . .

    Finally, how have I never read “Something Wicked” – that love letter to books and nostalgia – before now?

     

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