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166. Books Bought & Read, February 2018…

166. Books Bought & Read, February 2018…

The shortest month, but plenty of time for reading with winter making a late appearance in New York: 20 books bought, and 20 read, (although there is a case for counting the Harry Potter script as two books, since it literally says so on the cover…but since I bought it this month too, it wouldn’t affect the tally if I did, so it can stay as one, wonderfully nostalgic tome. I enjoyed it way more than I expected to, dipping my toes back into the history of Hogwarts and Harry’s (h)offspring).

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I also decided to stop including gifts in my Books Bought tally, (and if you don’t like it, go start your own bookblog!), so you can add around 20% to the totals from hereon in, and I even briefly considered not including ‘swaps’ – books I already own which I buy just for the new edition it comes in, (i.e. most of the Penguin Classic Deluxe Editions I picked up this month, in case you saw Bridget Jones and Amy Tan and were wondering if you had slipped into a time-warp and it’s the 1990s again).

There was, as ever, a surreal blend of genres in my reading this month, starting with an amuse-bouche of graphic novels, (Tomine and Clowes, two of my favourites in the field, proving yet again that graphic novels are some of the best literature around), and reading Chomsky is like an anti-palate cleanser; it’s always good to remind yourself how filthy western history is, in case the current political climate has you yearning for the ‘good ole days.’

Memoir met New York history with a wonderful foodie bent in Tamara Shopsin’s unique ‘Arbitrary Stupid Goals,’ the history of her parents’ fantastic shop-turned-restaurant in my new stamping ground, Greenwich Village. Having recently moved to the Essex Street Market, and featuring almost 1,000 menu items, I have a new restaurant to visit, (and guidelines how to avoid being thrown out of it!).

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I somehow keep finding posthumous Vonnegut collections I haven’t read, and they keep failing to disappoint, as do the wonderfully informative Last Interview series. I may have to dip into some Philip K.Dick sci-fi as a result, to see the physical manifestation of the extraordinary paranoia he displays in this collection.

Possibly my favourite, guilty pleasure this month was a glossy, gorgeous, watch-shaped compilation of photos of deluxe time-pieces, and the stories of their owners. I’ve always been a horologophile, and this collection proved a fascinating late-night treat for the eyes.

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Books Bought, February 2018

The Seducer’s Diary (Søren Kierkegaard)

Bridget Jones’ Diary (Helen Fielding)

Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland & Alice Through The Looking Glass (Lewis Carroll)

The Last Interview (Philip K.Dick)

The Last Interview (Nora Ephron)

The Real Life Of Sebastian Knight (Vladimir Nabokov)

Kafka On The Shore (Haruki Murakami)

Letter To My Father (Franz Kafka)

Trickster Makes The World: mischief, myth, and art (Lewis Hyde)

The Joy Luck Club (Amy Tan)

Confabulations (John Berger)

Hector And The Search For Happiness (François Lelord)

One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (Ken Kesey)

Swing Time (Zadie Smith)

Havana: autobiography of a city (Alfredo José Estrada)

If This Isn’t Nice, What Is? (Kurt Vonnegut)

Shortcomings (Adrian Tomine)

Ice Haven (Daniel Clowes)

Harry Potter And The Cursed Child, parts I & II (J.K.Rowling)

The Imitation Game: alan turing decoded (Jim Ottaviani)

 

Books Read, February 2018 (highly recommended books in bold)

Drop Dead Healthy: one man’s humble quest for bodily perfection (A.J.Jacobs)

Everybody Lies: big data, new data, and what the internet can tell us about who we really are (Seth Stephens Davidowitz)

Table Manners: how to behave in the modern world and why bother (Jeremiah Towers)

The New Wine Rules: a genuinely helpful guide to everything you need to know (Jon Bonné)

You May Also Like: taste in an age of endless choice (Tom Vanderbilt)

The Last Interview (Philip K.Dick)

The Last Interview (Nora Ephron)

Arbitrary Stupid Goal (Tamara Shopsin)

Will You Always Love Me? (Joyce Carol Oates)

Hector And The Search For Happiness (François Lelord)

A Man And His Watch (Matt Hranek)

Ice Haven (Daniel Clowes)

Shortcomings (Adrian Tomine)

Confabulations (John Berger)

If This Isn’t Nice, What Is? (Kurt Vonnegut)

Harry Potter And The Cursed Child, parts I & II (J.K.Rowling)

Where Was The Room Where It Happened? the unofficial hamiton, an american musical, location guide (B.L.Barreras)

Roy G Biv: an exceedingly surprising book about color (Jude Stewart)

The Prosperous Few And The Restless Many (Noam Chomsky)

What Uncle Sam Really Wants (Noam Chomsky)

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Posted by on March 24, 2018 in BOOKS

 

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156. Books Bought & Read, May 2017…

156. Books Bought & Read, May 2017…

 

Yipppeeeee! For the first time in quite a while I read more books than I bought this month, giving me the feeling that I have added the tiniest grain of order to an entropic universe, doing my smallest part in the fight for organisation in an uncaring, chaotic world.

It’s even better than the tally of 22 bought, 25 read seems, since several of those were presents, (or headed to the increasingly bulging Books To Gift stack), meaning I managed to get a few books ahead of myself in the past 31 days. This was almost miraculous given that I began a new job two weeks ago, and am spending much of my spare time trying to figure out the difference between computer storage and memory.

Sure, many of the books I read were (as ever) graphic novels, but when Neil Gaiman declares a work “The best graphic novel I’ve read in years” you know it’s going to be worthwhile, and it was: Scott McCloud’s ‘The Sculptor‘ was a tender, mythical look into art, life, Faustian bargains and final intentions by the writer/artist who brought us the excellent ‘Understanding Comics‘.

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Many were Penguin Great Ideas, the series of beautifully bound, 100-page selections ranging across styles, centuries and themes, from Orwell on the price of books to Marco Polo on his adventures, and one each came from Penguin’s Great Journeys series (shipwrecks in the Americas) and their Great Loves collection (the slightly interminable Abelard and Heloïse), as well as the highly (and rightly) acclaimed Paul Kalinithi on turning from doctor to patient when cancer curtailed both his career and his life in ‘When Breath Becomes Air‘.

But I also found time to finally devour George Saunders‘ debut novel, ‘Lincoln In The Bardo,’ a sweet, smart sea of voices from beyond the grave commentating on life, death, politics, and everything else which makes us human, with all of Saunders’ typically tender touch.

In ever-eclectic fashion, I devoured books on feminism (after attending a talk by the excellent Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie); modern American racism (by the powerfully persuasive Michael Eric Dyson); and the history of Dungeons & Dragons in graphic novel form.

But this month’s highlights were stories: firstly from one of my favourite Young Adult authors, David Almond, who crafted a collection of childhood memories into allegorical tales so powerful one of them left me in tears.

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And secondly, a first collection from The Moth story-telling events, which take place monthly at my workplace, Housing Works Bookstore Cafe, and which I finally plan to attend next month.

Ranging from the famous to the everyday, from euphoric yarns to tragic tales, from universal themes to the peculiarly personal, these snapshots of life should be enough to entertain anyone, whatever you’re looking for.

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And, of course, Neil gets to write the foreword.

 

 

Books Bought, May 2017

We Have Always Lived In The Castle, (Shirley Jackson)

Tasty: the art and science of what we eat (John McQuaid)

The Shadow Of The Sun (Ryszard Kapuściński)

Setting The Table: the transforming power of hospitality in business (Danny Meyer)

The Polysyllabic Spree (Nick Hornby)

Rise Of The Dungeon Master: gary gygax and the creation of d&d (David Kushner)

The Sandmeyer Reaction (Michael Chabon)

Hostage (Guy Delisle)

Wall And Piece (Banksy)

Nobody’s Fool (Yoshitomo Nara)

The Sculptor (Scott McCloud)

In Persuasion Nation (George Saunders)

Anansi Boys (Neil Gaiman)

Neverwhere (Neil Gaiman)

The Moth Presents – All These Wonders: true stories about facing the unknown (various)

The Book Of Cheese: the essential guide to discover chesses you’ll love (Liz Thorpe)

The Dinner Party and other stories (Joshua Ferris)

Last Night’s Reading: illustrated encounters with extraordinary authors (Kate Gavino)

A Graphic History Of Sport: an illustrated chronicle of the greatest wins, misses, and matchups from the games we love (Andrew Janik)

The Greek Myths (ed.Robert Graves)

Scribbled In The Dark (Charles Simic)

A Book Of Sleep (Il Sung Na)

 

Books Read, May 2017   (Recommended books in bold)

Tasty: the art and science of what we eat (John McQuaid)

Tears We Cannot Stop: a sermon to white america (Michael Eric Dyson)

Absolutely On Music: conversations with (Haruki Murakami & Seiji Ozawa)

When Breath Becomes Air (Paul Kalanithi)

Dear Ijeawele, Or A Feminist Manifesto In Fifteen Suggestions (Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie)

Occupy (Noam Chomsky)

Books vs Cigarettes (George Orwell)

Travels In The Land Of Kublai Khan (Marco Polo)

Lincoln In The Bardo (George Saunders)

Rise Of The Dungeon Master: gary gygax and the creation of d&d (David Kushner)

The Shipwrecked Men (Cabeza de Vaca)

Forbidden Fruit: from the letters of aberlard and heloïse

The Sculptor (Scott McCloud)

Half A Creature From The Sea: a life in stories (David Almond)

Setting The Table: the transforming power of hospitality in business (Danny Meyer)

The Sandmeyer Reaction (Michael Chabon)

Hostage (Guy Delisle)

Snow White (Donald Barthelme)

The Moth Presents – All These Wonders: true stories about facing the unknown (various)

Last Night’s Reading: illustrated encounters with extraordinary authors (Kate Gavino)

A Graphic History Of Sport: an illustrated chronicle of the greatest wins, misses, and matchups from the games we love (Andrew Janik)

Scribbled In The Dark (Charles Simic)

Go Tell It On The Mountain (James Baldwin)

A Book Of Sleep (Il Sung Na)

House Mother Normal (B.S.Johnson)

 
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Posted by on June 2, 2017 in BOOKS

 

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150. Books Bought & Read, November 2016…

150. Books Bought & Read, November 2016…

30 books bought, 14 read in the penultimate month of 2016, and around half of them were polished off on the beaches of Bali, on my honeymoon.

After October Comic Con in New York, the early part of November consisted mainly of reading a couple of graphic novels and finishing a few more books on Manhattan history, (since I begin my fourth incarnation is a vagabond guide next week), as well as polishing off a couple more in the wonderful (and wonderfully short) Ted Talks books, which are so good they will be getting their own blog entry soon.

But from November 14 my wife and I packed up our flippers, masks and a bag each of books and decamped to the land of temples, smiles, and nasi goreng for breakfast.

In hindsight, I realise that it may be slightly strange that the three main books I read on my honeymoon involved slavery, murder, and a blend of both in apartheid South Africa, but as you can see from the list at the end of the blog, they all ended up in bold, because they were all wonderful in their own way.

After every single person I have ever read had recommended it to me, I finally used the beach time to read Donna Tartt’s ‘The Secret History,’ (which was great although it lacked a final twist I was vaguely expecting). I also finally know why Colson Whitehead’s chilling ‘The Underground Railroad‘ won just about every award going last year, for his tale of an escaped 19th century slave experiencing various incarnations of the issue of slavery on a state by state basis.

Most surprisingly was how much I enjoyed ‘Daily Show‘ host Trevor Noah‘s autobiography, and not just because I have spent a few months in his native South Africa. The comedian writes simply and smoothly, with far less comedy than expected, but with wonderful stories on the importance of languages in the incredibly multilingual Johannesburg, and how a life of crime can seem commonplace when you’re inside a practically hopeless situation.

He even manages to make an anecdote about burning down somebody’s house seem somehow innocent.

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Continuing my gradual Americanisation, I managed to buy not one but two books on baseball this month…although I haven’t read either of them yet, and may well never even open them.

And talking of books to be seen and not read, most of my haul from work last month fell firmly into the ‘coffee table‘ category, (or, since we don’t own a coffee table, the ‘Top Shelf of the Bookshelf‘ category), mainly art books along with a beautiful, over-sized tome on the making of the musical ‘Hamilton‘, (the closest I will get to the Broadway show for a while, I fear).

Perhaps most exciting was finally reading a graphic novel from my old friend Sylvain, (under his pen name of Runberg), who provided me with a signed copy of his latest, (of 68!), when he came to town last month.

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Go check them all out.

 

 

Books Bought, November 2016

Follow Your Gut: the enormous impact of tiny microbes (Bob Knight & Brenda Shuler)

The Botany Of Desire (Michael Pollan)

Jeter: unfiltered (Derek Jeter)

McSweeney’s No.48 (various)

Pitching In A Pinch: baseball from the inside (Christy Mathewson)

Silence (Suhusaku Endo)

Color (Victoria Finlay)

The Learners (Chip Kidd)

Day Of The Oprichnik (Vladimir Sorokin)

Peter Pan (J.M.Barrie)

1Q84 (Haruki Murakami)

Awful Auntie (David Walliams)

The Search (Geoff Dyer)

The Colour Of Memory (Geoff Dyer)

The Missing Of The Somme (Geoff Dyer)

Hamilton: the revolution (Lin-Manuel Miranda & Jeremy McCarter)

Justine (Lawrence Durrell)

Saints And Strangers (Angela Carter)

Fireworks: nine profane pieces (Angela Carter)

History Of Beauty (ed.Umberto Eco)

The Speech Writer: a brief education in politics (Barton Swaim)

Payoff: the hidden logic that shapes our motivations (Dan Ariely)

The Geography Of Genius: lessons from the world’s most creative places (Eric Weiner)

Slice Harvester: a memoir in pizza (Colin Atrophy Hagendorf)

Birth And Present: a studio portrait of yoshitomo nara

Warren The 13th And The All-Seeing Eye (Tania Del Rio & Will Staehle)

The Infidels (Marcel Dzama)

A Picasso Portfolio

Si Pangeran Kecil/The Little Prince (Indonesian version) (Antoine de Saint Exupéry)

Decoded (Mai Jia)

 

Books Read, November 2016

Warship Jolly Roger (Sylvain Runberg & Miguel Montlló)

Payoff: the hidden logic that shapes our motivations (Dan Ariely)

Follow Your Gut: the enormous impact of tiny microbes, (Bob Knight & Brenda Shuler)

Inside The Apple: a streetwise history of new york city (Michelle & James Nevius)

Summer Blonde (Adrian Tomine)

Naming New York: manhattan places and how they got their names (Sanna Feierstein)

Awful Auntie (David Walliams)

The Coast Of Utopia, pt.1: voyage (Tom Stoppard)

Secret New York: an unusual guide (T.M.Rives)

The Speech Writer: a brief education in politics (Barton Swaim)

Born A Crime: stories from a south african childhood (Trevor Noah)

The Underground Railroad (Colson Whitehead)

The Secret History (Donna Tartt)

Wilderness Tips (Margaret Atwood)

 

 

 
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Posted by on December 11, 2016 in BOOKS

 

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