RSS

Tag Archives: Guy Delisle

93. Books Bought & Read, November 2013…

Books Bought, November 2013

The Marx Brothers Poster Book.‘ 

1Q84,’ Murakami Haruki

Stuff I’ve Been Reading,’ Nick Hornby

To The Letter,’ Simon Garfield

Fortunately The Milk…,’ Neil Gaiman

Pygmies,’ Chuck Palahniuk

Writings From The Zen Master,’ (Penguin Great Ideas Series)

Where I Lived And What I Lived For,’ Henry David Thoreau, (Penguin Great Ideas Series)

Toothpicks And Logos: design in everyday life,’ John Heskett

Nobody Belongs Here More Than You,’ Miranda July

Fight Club,’ Chuck Palahnkiuk

The Scarecrow And His Servant,’ Philip Pullman

The Total Library: non-fiction, 1922-1986,’ Jorge Luis Borges

Burma Chronicles,’ Guy Delisle

Speaking With The Angel,’ ed.Nick Hornby

Skullduggery Pleasant: playing with fire,’ Derek Landy

.

Books Read, November 2013

Grantland, issue 5

Grantland, issue 6

Grantland, issue 7

The True Tale Of Billy Dean As Tellt By Himself,’ David Almond

Monkey,’ Wu Ch’êng Ch’ên

To The Letter,’ Simon Garfield

Seven Nights,’ Jorge Luis Borges

Toothpicks And Logos: design in everyday life,’ John Heskett

Super Sad True Love Story,’ Gary Shteyngart

Fortunately The Milk…,’ Neil Gaiman

The Believer, issue 102

I, Coriander,’ Sally Gardener

The Celestial Café,’ Stuart Murdoch

Gentlemen Of The Road,’ Michael Chabon

The Imperfectionists,’ Tom Rachmann

Mother Brother Lover: selected lyrics,’ Jarvis Cocker

52 Ways Of Looking At A Poem: a poem for every week of the year,’ Ruth Padel

Utopia,’ Thomas More

Burma Chronicles,’ Guy Delisle

Hell Screen,’ Ryunosuke Akutagawa

The Scarecrow And His Servant,’ Philip Pullman

The Coincidence Engine,’ Sam Leith

Pulling ahead of the books bought/read debit column yet again, I had a very varied and enjoyable reading month. The month started, tucked up warm in the family home in Essex, devouring a trio of Grantland sports journals, (an incredible way to catch up on a year’s worth of mainly US-based sports and culture), before I made my way through a backlog of YA (young adult) books from the wonderful David Almond, Sally Gardener, Philip Pullman and my beloved Neil Gaiman.

imgres I picked up a promo copy of the interesting but slightly disappointing ‘To The Letter,’ by the imgres-2author who wrote my favourite book of the year so far, ‘Just My Type;‘  learned about design in the modern day from a short tract by Chair Professor Emeritus John Heskett; and tracked down a further episode in Guy Delisles incredible graphic depiction of life in some of the most bizarre corners of the world, (Guy being a French-Canadian artist who follows his wife on her travels with Médecins Sans Frontières from North Korea to Jerusalem to, here, Myanmar).

burma_en

With a month at home between countries, (where some people are between jobs, I am usually also between countries), I took the opportunity to read some of the signed copies which are confined to my childhood bedroom cupboard, most enjoyable of which was the excellent ‘The Imperfectionists‘ by Tom Rachmann, a multi-registered, decades-long look at the life of various characters in an imaginary newspaper, which simultaneously made me want to work in journalism and deeply glad that I don’t. Quite a feat.

Mainly, this was a month of poetry. I often find myself buying poetry collections, (either because they are small volumes, or beautifully bound, or with names I feel I should know and have read), and they have slowly built up a layer of dust on a poetry shelf above my bed. Having read Stephen Fry‘s excellent introduction to poetry, ‘The Ode Less Travelled,’ last year, I finally continued my education with Ruth Padel‘s ‘52 Ways To Read A Poem,’ a weekly newspaper column which examines and explains a series of short, contemporary poems. This inspired me to read two books I have from two of my favourite singers, Belle and Sebastian’s Stuart Murdoch, (who wrote a poetic, although slightly dull, computer diary), and song lyrics from Pulp’s Jarvis Cocker, although the enigmatic Cocker himself insists that lyrics are nothing like poetry).

I leave you with the final stanza from a simple, strangely beautiful and yet slightly disturbing poem by ‘folk-jazz musician’ Don Paterson entitled ‘Imperial,’ a paragraph which stayed with me after I’d finished reading all 52 poems in the collection, (which, being me, I decided to tackle five at a time: who has a year to read a book?!).

“and no trade was ever so fair or so tender;

so where was the flaw in the plan,

the night we lay down on the flag of surrender

and woke on the flag of Japan”

The most lyrical depiction of a slightly coerced taking of virginity you are ever likely to read.

.

urlimagesgrantland7_lgimages-151jjmHMGm1Lurl-151X1oyhH38L._SL1236_9780191568367_p0_v1_s260x420images-2url-261eO73hn+yL._SX342_url-3url-6200px-ChabonGentlemenuntitledurl-441V1XX0QWSL._images-3burma_en10517543url-8url-9

Advertisements
 
1 Comment

Posted by on December 8, 2013 in BOOKS

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

36. Books Bought & Read, July 2012…

36. Books Bought & Read, July 2012…

Books Bought, July 2012

A Short History Of Wine,Rod Phillips

Westminster,” Malcolm Day

Shakespeare’s London,” Malcolm Day

Priceless,” Robert.K.Wittman

The Wicked Wit Of Winston Churchill,” ed. Dominique Enwright 

Suddenly, A Knock At The Door,” Etgar Keret

Alice In Wonderland/Alice’s Adventures Through The Looking Glass,” Lewis Carroll

Tim The Tiny Horse At Large,” Harry Hill

Take The Cannoli,” Sarah Vowell

Horrible Histories: Terrible Tudors,” Terry Deary & Martin Brown

Horrible Histories: Gorgeous Georgians,” Terry Deary & Martin Brown

Horrible Histories: Measly Middle Ages,” Terry Deary & Martin Brown

Horrible Histories: Barmy British Empire,” Terry Deary & Martin Brown

Horrible Histories: Cut-Throat Celts,” Terry Deary & Martin Brown

Horrible Histories: Smashing Saxons,” fishTerry Deary & Martin Brown

If You Prefer a Milder Comedian, Please Ask For One,” Stewart Lee

Only Revolutions,” Mark.Z.Danielowski

Mr.Gum: 8 book box set,” Andy Stanton

There’s Probably No God: an atheist’s guide to christmas,” ed.Adriane Sherin

Breakfast At The Wolseley,” A.A.Gill

 

Books Read, July 2012

Grantland No.2,” ed. McSweeney’s

Taking Chances,” John Haigh

The Football Men,” Simon Kuper

What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank,” Nathan Englander

Boris’s London,” Boris Johnson

Westminster,” Malcolm Day

Shakespeare’s London,” Malcolm Day

A Short History of Wine,” Rod Phillips

Proust and the Squid,” Maryanne Wolf

Suddenly, A Knock At The Door,” Etgar Keret

Take The Cannoli,” Sarah Vowell

Tim The Tiny Horse At Large,” Harry Hill

If You Prefer a Milder Comedian, Please Ask For One,” Stewart Lee

The Wicked Wit Of Winston Churchill,” ed. Dominique Enwright 

Breakfast At The Wolseley,” A.A.Gill

Horrible Histories: Gorgeous Georgians,” Terry Deary & Martin Brown

Horrible Histories: Measly Middle Ages,” Terry Deary & Martin Brown

Horrible Histories: Barmy British Empire,” Terry Deary & Martin Brown

Jerusalem,” Guy Delisle

 

Twenty books bought, nineteen read: at this rate, I’ll never catch up on all of the books I have to read, but it’s even worse than it first appears: one of those listed is a box-set of my favourite ‘kids’ book series, Mr.Gum, consisting of eight books, meaning this was really a 27-book month. Although I’ve already read three of them, and the same goes for the Alice books, which I couldn’t resist as I found them in a gorgeous edition, (I think this is the third Alice I now own).

So, we’ll call it a score draw for the month.

The most interesting feature of this month’s reading was probably that I had managed to get so many reviews written for some of the books in this blog: the Keret, the Vowell and the Wolf on short stories, American essays and the science of reading were all featured in recent posts, and one quarter of the quartet of comedy books I blogged a while ago was a tome by Stewart Lee, who I finally got around to seeing live in London, and subsequently picked up a signed book I hadn’t read for my best friend, who is a big fan of his. Seemed rude not to read it first, just to make sure he would enjoy it…

I discovered another fount of kids’ history books which I picked up, although I think I know all I need to about London history for my tours now, so I only actually read two of them. I topped them up with Mayor of London Boris Johnson’s amusing book on some of the figures who have made the capital what it is, (a copy picked up in Hay which, being signed, was not allowed to leave the hallowed confines of My Bedroom).

I think I’ll save the quotes for the next blog: for now, just know that I struggled through the wine history for far longer than I like to be reading a book for, (especially a book as dry, ironically, as this one); flew through the Grantland and short stories of Englander and Keret; finished off a soon-to-be blogged trio of football books with the excellent ‘Football Men’; and regressed with two comic books, the one a surreal tale of a sugar-lump sized horse by English comedian Harry Hill, and the other a fascinating look at the complications behind life as an ex-pat in Jerusalem by the world-roving Quebecois graphic novelist Guy Delisle. In case you were looking for something good to read this week…

 
1 Comment

Posted by on August 28, 2012 in BOOKS

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,