RSS

Tag Archives: Housing Works

174. Books Bought & Read, October 2018…

174. Books Bought & Read, October 2018…

To be fair, October is my birthday month, so it was only to be expected that I would go a little crazy with my book-buying, but this month was especially ridiculous.

I went somewhat wild knowing that there were only so many more times I would be able to get lost (both literally and figuratively) volunteering among the basement shelves at Housing Works, or browsing the boxes of books at The Strand at Central Park.

We’re moving, you see. Ditching one New for another, from anglicised to gallic, from York to Orleans.

So I had to make sure I had something good to read on the plane…

Hence this month’s totals: a full deck of 52 bought, a (comparatively) paltry 19 read.

As well as reading literature this month, I managed to hear it too, as my birthday weekend coincided with that rarest of sightings, a public talk by Haruki Murakami. He featured at the New Yorker Festival in Manhattan, and since tickets were priced obscenely I decided to simply show up at the venue and see if anyone had a spare.

They did, it was cheap, and I got to watch one of my literary idols spend over an hour charmingly explain how he never re-reads his own works, barely seems to remember plot minutiae which his audience clearly obsess over, and answer every other question/thesis from fans with some variation of: “I have no idea what that character was thinking, or what I meant by that. But yours sounds like a good theory!”

IMG_5319

IMG_5321

Haruki Murakami charms the audience at the New Yorker Festival, October 2018

My favourite revelation from him concerned a line in one of his most popular novels, “Kafka On The Shore.” The interviewer asked how he had uncovered the rare and wonderful fact that Franz Kafka loved diagonal lines. Murakami’s response: “I just made that up! It sounded right!”

If that’s not master fiction writing in a nutshell, I don’t know what is.

4929

I continued my novella-buying spree, the perfect bedside companions, and went on a boxing spree too. The excellent poetry collection on legendary African American boxer Jack Johnson (no relation) seemed to have been based directly on the chapter on him in Joyce Carol Oates’s expanded essay on the Sport of Kings which I’d happened to read just before it, and both were carefully crafted looks at the sport (if, as Oates may have convinced me, it is indeed a sport).

I also keep turning up beautiful editions of Arthur Miller plays, thanks to Penguin (as always).

I found and devoured the prequel to a book I’d much enjoyed several months ago, The Geography of Genius, this time Eric Weiner following a hot topic by reporting on various countries’ sense of happiness (or lack thereof) in The Geography of Bliss. This dovetailed with my recent obsession with ‘hygge‘-mania, and was a fun travelogue of a read.

bliss_pb1

Nick Hornby led me to Carlo Rovelli’s simple but mind-boggling short treatise on time and how it doesn’t really exist the way we experience it. The part of this densely packed scientific exploration which stuck with me, and seemed so simple and yet so inexplicable, was that most natural processes look different going forwards and backwards, since they all involve a transfer of heat in some way. All except time, which in its purest form would look identical flowing in either direction.

shopping

I’m not quite sure what this means, but I found it both beautiful and powerful.

Finally, I read Bertolt Brecht’s Threepenny Opera, (another Penguin Classic find, which dominated this month’s haul), and learned what an incredible impact it has had on our culture; I never knew the backstory to Sinatra’s hit Mack the Knife, and was blown away hearing the German original.

One more mystery book was included in this month’s reading, and next month will reveal the reason for all the redaction. Stay tuned…

51RRPJHTGQL._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_

Books Bought, October 2018

All My Sons (Arthur Miller)

A View From The Bridge (Arthur Miller)

Death Of A Salesman (Arthur Miller)

Anansi Boys (Neil Gaiman)

The Big Smoke (Adrian Matejka)

Haruki Murakami And The Music Of Words (Jay Rubin)

The Elephant Vanishes (Haruki Murakami)

The Dept.Of Speculation (Jennifer Ofill)

The Tale Of Tales (Giambattista Basile)

The Threepenny Opera (Bertolt Brecht)

While Mortals Sleep (Kurt Vonnegut)

Moomin: the complete lars jansson comic strip, vol.iv (Lars Jansson)

James Joyce: a life (Edna O’Brien)

The Laramie Project (Moisés Kaufman)

The Last Interview (David Foster Wallace)

The Pathseeker (Imre Kertész)

Adventures In The Rocky Mountains (Isabella Bird)

The Cobra’s Heart (Ryszard Kapuscinski)

Borneo, Celebes, Aru (Alfred Russel Wallace)

Across The Empty Quarter (Wilfred Thesiger)

from The Meadows Of Gold (Mas’Udi)

Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban (J.K.Rowling)

All Souls (Javier Marías)

An Incomplete Book Of Awesome Things

A Midsummer Night’s Dream: a fairies primer (Jennifer Adams & Alison Oliver)

Close To Jedenew (Kevin Vennemann)

Penguin Mini Classics box set (various, 80 books)

The Order Of Time (Carlo Rovelli)

Same Same (Peter Mendelson)

The Infinity Of Lists (Umberto Eco)

The Union Jack (Imre Kertész)

Customer Service (Benoît Duteurte)

Parnassus On Wheels (Christopher Morley)

Fun Home (Alison Bechdel)

The Confidence Game: why we fall for it…every time (Maria Konnikova)

Moomin: the complete tove jansson comic strip, vol.I (Tove Jansson)

Iggy Peck, Architect (Andrea Beaty & David Roberts)

What Do You Do With A Problem? (Kobi Yamada & Mae Besom)

The Tiger’s Wife (Tea O’Brecht)

Julia Child: a life (Laura Shapiro)

The Wind In The Willows (Kenneth Graham)

Nutcracker And Mouse King/The Tale Of The Nutcracker (E.T.A.Hoffmann/Alexandre Dumas)

Orient Express (Graham Greene)

101 Things I Learned In Film School (Neil Landau & Matthew Fredericks)

Spell (Anne Lauterbach)

The Intergraphic History Of The World (Valentina DEfilippo & James Ball)

The Wondrous Workings Of Planet Earth: understanding our world and its ecosystems (Rachel Ignotofsky)

A Portrait Of The Artist (James Joyce)

Moral Disorder (Margaret Atwood)

The Man Who Had All The Luck (Henry Miller)

Black Panther, Vol.IV (Ta Nehisi-Coates)

Between Eternities: and other writings (Javier Marías)

 

Books Read, October 2018 (highly recommended books in bold)

The Pickle Index (Eli Horowitz & Ian Huebert)

On Boxing (Joyce Carol Oates)

The Big Smoke (Adrian Matejka)

The Geography Of Bliss (Eric Weiner)

All My Sons (Arthur Miller)

A View From The Bridge (Arthur Miller)

Death Of A Salesman (Arthur Miller)

The Last Interview (David Foster Wallace)

The Laramie Project (Moisés Kaufman)

The Threepenny Opera (Bertolt Brecht)

The Golden House (Salman Rushdie)

While Mortals Sleep (Kurt Vonnegut)

James Joyce: a life (Edna O’Brien)

*******’ **** **** **** ******* (**** & ***) (Book redacted pending future update)

The Order Of Time (Carlo Rovelli)

Fun Home (Alison Bechdel)

101 Things I Learned In Film School (Neil Landau & Matthew Fredericks)

Black Panther, Vol.IV (Ta Nehisi-Coates)

Spell (Anne Lauterbach)

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 27, 2018 in BOOKS

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

156. Books Bought & Read, May 2017…

156. Books Bought & Read, May 2017…

 

Yipppeeeee! For the first time in quite a while I read more books than I bought this month, giving me the feeling that I have added the tiniest grain of order to an entropic universe, doing my smallest part in the fight for organisation in an uncaring, chaotic world.

It’s even better than the tally of 22 bought, 25 read seems, since several of those were presents, (or headed to the increasingly bulging Books To Gift stack), meaning I managed to get a few books ahead of myself in the past 31 days. This was almost miraculous given that I began a new job two weeks ago, and am spending much of my spare time trying to figure out the difference between computer storage and memory.

Sure, many of the books I read were (as ever) graphic novels, but when Neil Gaiman declares a work “The best graphic novel I’ve read in years” you know it’s going to be worthwhile, and it was: Scott McCloud’s ‘The Sculptor‘ was a tender, mythical look into art, life, Faustian bargains and final intentions by the writer/artist who brought us the excellent ‘Understanding Comics‘.

images-5

Many were Penguin Great Ideas, the series of beautifully bound, 100-page selections ranging across styles, centuries and themes, from Orwell on the price of books to Marco Polo on his adventures, and one each came from Penguin’s Great Journeys series (shipwrecks in the Americas) and their Great Loves collection (the slightly interminable Abelard and Heloïse), as well as the highly (and rightly) acclaimed Paul Kalinithi on turning from doctor to patient when cancer curtailed both his career and his life in ‘When Breath Becomes Air‘.

But I also found time to finally devour George Saunders‘ debut novel, ‘Lincoln In The Bardo,’ a sweet, smart sea of voices from beyond the grave commentating on life, death, politics, and everything else which makes us human, with all of Saunders’ typically tender touch.

In ever-eclectic fashion, I devoured books on feminism (after attending a talk by the excellent Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie); modern American racism (by the powerfully persuasive Michael Eric Dyson); and the history of Dungeons & Dragons in graphic novel form.

But this month’s highlights were stories: firstly from one of my favourite Young Adult authors, David Almond, who crafted a collection of childhood memories into allegorical tales so powerful one of them left me in tears.

images-6

And secondly, a first collection from The Moth story-telling events, which take place monthly at my workplace, Housing Works Bookstore Cafe, and which I finally plan to attend next month.

Ranging from the famous to the everyday, from euphoric yarns to tragic tales, from universal themes to the peculiarly personal, these snapshots of life should be enough to entertain anyone, whatever you’re looking for.

51fq+TAnW2L

And, of course, Neil gets to write the foreword.

 

 

Books Bought, May 2017

We Have Always Lived In The Castle, (Shirley Jackson)

Tasty: the art and science of what we eat (John McQuaid)

The Shadow Of The Sun (Ryszard Kapuściński)

Setting The Table: the transforming power of hospitality in business (Danny Meyer)

The Polysyllabic Spree (Nick Hornby)

Rise Of The Dungeon Master: gary gygax and the creation of d&d (David Kushner)

The Sandmeyer Reaction (Michael Chabon)

Hostage (Guy Delisle)

Wall And Piece (Banksy)

Nobody’s Fool (Yoshitomo Nara)

The Sculptor (Scott McCloud)

In Persuasion Nation (George Saunders)

Anansi Boys (Neil Gaiman)

Neverwhere (Neil Gaiman)

The Moth Presents – All These Wonders: true stories about facing the unknown (various)

The Book Of Cheese: the essential guide to discover chesses you’ll love (Liz Thorpe)

The Dinner Party and other stories (Joshua Ferris)

Last Night’s Reading: illustrated encounters with extraordinary authors (Kate Gavino)

A Graphic History Of Sport: an illustrated chronicle of the greatest wins, misses, and matchups from the games we love (Andrew Janik)

The Greek Myths (ed.Robert Graves)

Scribbled In The Dark (Charles Simic)

A Book Of Sleep (Il Sung Na)

 

Books Read, May 2017   (Recommended books in bold)

Tasty: the art and science of what we eat (John McQuaid)

Tears We Cannot Stop: a sermon to white america (Michael Eric Dyson)

Absolutely On Music: conversations with (Haruki Murakami & Seiji Ozawa)

When Breath Becomes Air (Paul Kalanithi)

Dear Ijeawele, Or A Feminist Manifesto In Fifteen Suggestions (Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie)

Occupy (Noam Chomsky)

Books vs Cigarettes (George Orwell)

Travels In The Land Of Kublai Khan (Marco Polo)

Lincoln In The Bardo (George Saunders)

Rise Of The Dungeon Master: gary gygax and the creation of d&d (David Kushner)

The Shipwrecked Men (Cabeza de Vaca)

Forbidden Fruit: from the letters of aberlard and heloïse

The Sculptor (Scott McCloud)

Half A Creature From The Sea: a life in stories (David Almond)

Setting The Table: the transforming power of hospitality in business (Danny Meyer)

The Sandmeyer Reaction (Michael Chabon)

Hostage (Guy Delisle)

Snow White (Donald Barthelme)

The Moth Presents – All These Wonders: true stories about facing the unknown (various)

Last Night’s Reading: illustrated encounters with extraordinary authors (Kate Gavino)

A Graphic History Of Sport: an illustrated chronicle of the greatest wins, misses, and matchups from the games we love (Andrew Janik)

Scribbled In The Dark (Charles Simic)

Go Tell It On The Mountain (James Baldwin)

A Book Of Sleep (Il Sung Na)

House Mother Normal (B.S.Johnson)

 
1 Comment

Posted by on June 2, 2017 in BOOKS

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

154. Books Bought & Read, March 2017…

154. Books Bought & Read, March 2017…

March 2017 saw me pad my early-season stats with a bingo-esque 44 books bought, 26 read.

I was almost neck-and-neck in my buying:reading ratio last month until, perhaps getting a little cocky, I visited my old friend Chris at the Central Park Strand Stand for the first time in weeks, (walking away eight books heavier, mainly the colourful edition of Vonnegut novels I have decided to re-collect all of his novels in), and found a small treasure trove of food-based books during my last shift at the Housing Works charity bookstore where I am now struggling to find time to volunteer.

The reason for both of these last facts, (kitchen reading and lack of time), is that I found myself accidentally getting a new job this month. This weekend I became a fully trained tour guide for the oldest (and the best!) food tasting tour company in NYC, the wonderful Foods of New York Tours. If you want to be led around Greenwich Village and fed by me, both literally and informationally, get in touch!

Foodtour5

Until those tours, and a side project I have working at a small, plucky startup company called Apple kick in properly next month, I am reading as much as possible, from an advance copy on the science behind ‘Flavo(u)r’ (did you know foods can taste better depending on the colour or weight of the plate?) to the ever-informative Michael Pollan on how cooking makes us more human, (and apparently the Netflix series isn’t too bad, either).

I cleansed my palette with a surprisingly heavy diet of death…and comic books.

I found a two small collections of final thoughts from two perennial thought-provokers, (Oliver Sacks and Christopher Hitchens), and Neil Gaiman’s fun and fierce retelling of Norse Mythology kind of fit right in, as the gods go around killing whomsoever they want, (and often being killed themselves…for a while). It seems unfair that Neil Gaiman not only writes so wonderfully, but gets the most stunning covers: the 3D-feeling MjölnirHammer of Thor, making for a stunning image on the front of his latest collection of tales.

images-11

16601561_10154280481173837_231250390566631363_o.jpg

I was excited to finally read some James Baldwin, after seeing the wonderful documentary on him last month, and both Ted Talk books lived up to previous expectations, especially the one on architecture, but the surprise find of the month came from a sliver of a book which caught my eye due to its author, (not that Andy Kaufman, it turned out…)

images-9

‘All My Friends Are Superheroes’ was a wonderfully witty, wryly romantic, hipster-nerd romcom of a tale, and if you don’t feel like buying it you could probably read it in half an hour in the bookshop.

Just don’t tell them I sent you…

Books Bought, March 2017

The Fire Next Time (James Baldwin)

Peanuts: the art of charles m.schultz (ed.Chip Kidd)

Dig If You Will The Picture: funk, sex, god and genius in the music of prince (Ben Greenman) x2

Know This: today’s most interesting and important scientific ideas, discoveries, and developments (ed.John Brockman)

X: a highly specific, defiantly incomplete history of the early 21st century (Chuck Klosterman)

The Adventures Of John Blake: mystery of the ghost ship (Philip Pullman & Fred Fordham)

H Is For Hawk (Helen MacDonald)

When Breath Becomes Air (Paul Kalanithi)

The Schooldays Of Jesus (J.M.Coetzee)

Tears We Cannot Stop (Michael Eric Dyson)

Absolutely On Music (Haruki Murakami & Seiji Ozawa)

The Fireside Grown-Up Guide To The Midlife Crisis (Jason Hazeley & Joel Morris)

The Fireside Grown-Up Guide To The Hipster (Jason Hazeley & Joel Morris)

Not My Father’s Son (Alan Cumming)

McSweeney’s No.5

Flash Boys (Michael Lewis)

Go Tell It On The Mountains (James Baldwin)

All My Friends Are Superheroes (Andrew Kaufman)

How To Make Books (Esther K.Smith)

Make Trouble (John Waters)

Tales Of Ancient Egypt (Roger Lancelyn Green)

Universal: a guide to the cosmos (Brian Cox & Jeff Forshaw)

The Global Novel: writing the world in the 21st century (Adam Kirsch)

Garlic And Sapphires: the secret life of a critic in disguise (Ruth Reichl)

Flavor: the science of our most neglected sense (Bob Holmes)

Selected Poems (Edna St.Vincent Millay)

Revolution For Dummies: laughing through the arab spring (Bassem Youssef)

The Village: 400 years of beats and bohemians, radicals and rogues, a history of greenwich village (John Strasbaugh)

The Last Unicorn (Peter S.Beagle)

How To Talk To Girls At Parties (Neil Gaiman, Gabriel Bá & Fábio Moon)

The Essex Serpent (Sarah Perry)

The Food And Wine Of France: eating and drinking from champagne to provence (Edward Behr)

The Beats: a graphic history (Harvey Pekar et al)

In The Land Of Invented Languages: adventures in linguistic creativity, madness, and genius (Arika Okrent)

Home And Away: writing the beautiful game (Karl Ove Knausgaard & Fredrik Ekelund)

An Abbreviated Life (Ariel Leve)

Bluebeard (Kurt Vonnegut)

Mother Night (Kurt Vonnegut)

Sirens Of Titan (Kurt Vonnegut)

David Boring (Daniel Clowes)

The Last Interview (Lou Reed)

The New York Stories (John O’Hara)

You, Too, Could Write A Poem (David Orr)

111 Shops In New York That You Must Not Miss: unique finds and local treasures (Susan Lusk & Mark Gabor)

 

Books Read, March 2017 (Recommended books in bold)

Moving To Higher Ground: how jazz can change your life (Wynton Marsalis)

The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen: century – 1969 (Alan Moore & Kevin O’Neill)

Why We Work (Barry Schwartz)

Patience (Daniel Clowes)

The Art Of Stillness: adventures in going nowhere (Pico Iyer)

Gratitude (Oliver Sacks)

Mortality (Christopher Hitchens)

Norse Mythology (Neil Gaiman)

Peanuts: the art of charles m.schultz (ed.Chip Kidd)

The Adventures Of John Blake: mystery of the ghost ship (Philip Pullman & Fred Fordham)

Museum Legs: fatigue and hope in the face of art (Amy Whitaker)

Bat-Manga! the secret history of batman in japan (ed.Chip Kidd)

The Fireside Grown-Up Guide To The Midlife Crisis (Jason Hazeley & Joel Morris)

The Fireside Grown-Up Guide To The Hipster (Jason Hazeley & Joel Morris)

The Future Of Architecture In 100 Buildings (Mark Kushner)

All My Friends Are Superheroes (Andrew Kaufman)

Islam: a short history (Karen Armstrong)

The Fire Next Time (James Baldwin)

Cooked: a natural history of transformation (Michael Pollan)

A Grief Observed (C.S.Lewis)

Make Trouble (John Waters)

The Global Novel: writing the world in the 21st century (Adam Kirsch)

Flavor: the science of our most neglected sense (Bob Holmes)

How To Talk To Girls At Parties (Neil Gaiman, Gabriel Bá & Fábio Moon)

Garlic And Sapphires: the secret life of a critic in disguise (Ruth Reichl)

The Beats: a graphic history (Harvey Pekar et al)

 
6 Comments

Posted by on April 4, 2017 in BOOKS

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,