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165. Books Bought & Read, January 2018…

165. Books Bought & Read, January 2018…

2018 began where 2017 left off: with me struggling to finish enough books at the end of the month to out-read my 20 purchases, and yet again I just about managed to keep my nose in front by single volume, (the wonderfully opaque, yet readable allegorical parable, or possibly parabolic allegory, The Schooldays Of Jesus by J.M.Coetzee).

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I also got in early for February’s  Black History Month with a ‘What If Only African Americans Had Super Powers’ Kickstarter funded graphic novel, and the excellent How To for blacks and friends of blacks in modern-day America.

It was a good reading month for me, and there are a LOT of recommendations this month, from Margaret Atwood’s recent collection of random (and surprisingly dark) short stories, to a return to form for Dave Eggers, (after the slow Hologram For The King and the dire, didactic The Circle), with the beautifully observed story of a single mother trailing across Alaska with her two young children in Heroes Of The Frontier.

Science featured heavily in January. I’m thoroughly enjoying  working my way back through journalist A.J.Jacobs‘ complete back catalogue. What’s not to like? He thinks of a ridiculous experiment and then dedicates himself to seeing it through and reporting on it, this time attempting to organise the world’s largest family reunion following the logic that we are all, essentially, part of the same (very extended) family. I now know how important Mormons are to the hereditary industry, and also wish I had A.J’s life.

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I followed this up with the wonderfully silly We Have No Idea, an illustrated manual to everything we don’t know about the universe, aimed at kids but wonderfully informative for scientifically-impaired grown-ups like me, too.

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You may have spotted a couple of geographically specific books, due to the fact that we ignored “President” Trump’s warnings and decided to fulfil a lifelong ambition to visit Cuba, thereby escaping a chunk of New York’s winter, (which seems to come around practically every year…)

Havana was old, crumbling, warm, friendly, cheap, fascinating, welcoming, just good old fashioned fun, (literally old fashioned, with the endless 1950’s classic cars on every street corner), and I could appreciate the images, symbolism and mentality a little better thanks to the excellent Cuba On The Verge, a dozen essays on everything from the history to the fashion to the feminism of this endlessly fascinating country.

Highly recommended, whether or not you’re planning on visiting.

Books Bought, January 2018

The Boiling River (Andrés Ruzo)

The Chibok Girls (Helen Habila)

Imagine (Erik Johansson)

Born To Run (Bruce Springsteen)

You May Also Like: taste in an age of endless choice (Tom Vanderbilt)

Solve For Happy: engineer your path to joy (Mo Gawdat)

Poems That Make Grown Men Cry: 100 men on the words that move them (ed.Anthony & Ben Holden)

Poems That Make Grown Women Cry: 100 women on the words that move them (ed.Anthony & Ben Holden)

Vacationland (John Hodgman)

Taste: surprising stories and science about why food tastes good (Barb Stuckey)

It’s All Relative: adventures up and down the world family tree (A.J.Jacobs)

Everybody Lies: big data, new data, and what the internet can tell us about who we really are (Seth Stephens Davidowitz)

Angels With Dirty Faces: the footballing history of argentina (Jonathan Wilson)

We Have No Idea: a guide to the unknown universe (Jorge Cham & Daniel Whiteson)

Black (Osajyefo, Smith III, Igle & Randolph)

Star Wars: les plus belles affiches/the most beautiful posters (Drew Struzan0

The Art Of Neil Gaiman (Hayley Campbell)

Heroes Of The Frontier (Dave Eggers)

Talking To My Daughter About The Economy: a brief history of Capitalism (Yanis Varoufakis)

How To Be Black (Baratunde Thurston)

 

Books Read, January 2018 (highly recommended books in bold)

Hunger Makes Me A Modern Girl (Carrie Brownstein)

Stone Mattress: nine tales (Margaret Atwood)

Stranger In A Strange Land (Robert A.Heinlein)

A Tree In The Sea (Holly & Blake Kern)

Paris, Trance (Geoff Dyer)

Imagine (Erik Johansson)

Havana: a subtropical delirium (Mark Kurlansky)

Cuba On The Verge: 12 writers on continuity and change in havana and across the country (ed.Leila Geurreiro)

It’s All Relative: adventures up and down the world family tree (A.J.Jacobs)

Solve For Happy: engineer your path to joy (Mo Gawdat)

Black (Osajyefo, Smith III, Igle & Randolph)

The Chibok Girls (Helen Habila)

We Have No Idea: a guide to the unknown universe (Jorge Cham & Daniel Whiteson)

Vacationland (John Hodgman)

Am I Alone Here? notes on living to read and reading to live (Peter Ormer)

Star Wars: les plus belles affiches/the most beautiful posters (Drew Struzan0

Talking To My Daughter About The Economy: a brief history of Capitalism (Yanis Varoufakis)

Heroes Of The Frontier (Dave Eggers)

Einstein’s Riddle: riddles, paradoxes, and conundrums to stretch your mind  (Jeremy Stangroom)

How To Be Black (Baratunde Thurston)

The Schooldays Of Jesus (J.M.Coetzee)

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Posted by on March 13, 2018 in BOOKS

 

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