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157. Books Bought & Read, June 2017…

157. Books Bought & Read, June 2017…

In ‘Willpower,’ the fascinating study of that illusive character trait which I have in abundance when it comes to alcohol and not at all when it comes to purchasing books, Baumeister and Tierney discuss how strict diets can set the average weight watcher up for failure as, once you transgress your self-imposed limits once, it often leads to the food floodgates opening.

The bibliographic equivalent befell me this month.

Willpower

Since last month, I have made a vague effort to not read at least as many books as I buy, and with a week to go I was a couple of copies ahead of my purchasing potential.

And then I visited my friend Chris at the Central Park Strand Stand, and all the month’s good work was undone.

So it didn’t seem worthwhile holding back anymore, and I emerged later that (hot, humid, New York) afternoon from the mythical underground East Village Books and Records with three as-yet unowned editions of the Last Interview series (all B’s, bizarrely: Bolaño, Bradbury and my beloved Borges), as well as a second Kerouac of the month, (not bad for an author I’m pretty sure I dislike, but when Penguin decides to include him in their Classic Deluxe Editions, what’s a collector to do?!)

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So, 33 bought, 23 read, and a new written dietary regime begins afresh in July.

Frustratingly, in an effort to hurriedly rebalance the scales, I ended up reading a book I HAD ALREADY READ. Denis Johnson is an incredible, versatile author, and ‘The Laughing Monsters,’ his short tale of passion, betrayal and spies in Africa, may have been equally fun the second time around, but there are too many books in the universe, (or on my bookshelves, even), for me to read books twice. Fie.

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I was depressed by Joshua Ferris’s wonderfully bleak short story collection ‘The Dinner Party‘, (his debut novel, ‘Then We Came To The End,’ is still one of my favourites of the past few years); thought-provoked by Klosterman’s challenging ‘But What If We’re Wrong?’ (with its ingenious, OCD-infuriatingly upside-down cover); and discovered a new author when I finally read some Carson McCullers short stories, and went straight back to the shelf to wolf down her ‘ The Member Of The Wedding.

Nothing much happens in this lilting, Southern tale, but it fails to happen in such gorgeously described detail, and features a kind of female Catcher In The Rye, (as I saw the main character described), which makes for a wonderful reading experience.

But if there is one theme to last month’s reading, it is: beautiful editions.

Naturally, there were a few more informative TED talks , and I finally started in on the small corner of sweet, red-bound New York Review of Books kids series I have tucked away, (with a bizarre and bizarrely dark tale by Astrid Lindgren,), but it was the equally Scandewegian, equally fairy taley H.C.Anderson who provided the most beautiful bindings for my shelf.

Ten Speed Press released stunning, cloth-bound editions of two Anderson tales, (the puzzling ‘The Fir Tree‘ and the deeply disturbing ‘The Snow Queen‘), with illustrations from neighbouring Finn (and contender for Most Melodic Name Of All Time Award) Sanna Annukka. They were originally intended as presents for my (newly) 8-year-old niece, but somehow haven’t found their way off my shelf yet.

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Luckily, the same can’t be said for probably my favourite book this past month: ‘I’m Just No Good At Rhyming,’  from TV comedy writer Chris Harris. Within half a dozen pages I was a kid again, (not that it takes much…) reading Michael Rosen and Dr.Seuss and Shel Silverstein, and laughing out loud perhaps more than a 39-year-old should at a kids book of poems.

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Harris and illustrator Lane Smith make full use of page space, visual gags, comedy callbacks, and surrealism, sprinkled with just the right amount of not-too-much emotion to produce a work I was more than happy to present to my equally delighted niece.

Mainly because I had two copies.

 

 

Books Bought, June 2017

Seiobo There Below (László Krasznahorkai)

The Sunset Limited (Cormac McCarthy)

The Ballad Of The Sad Cafe and other stories(Carson McCullers)

Americanah (Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie)

On The Road (Jack Kerouac)

The Wonderful O (James Thurber)

The Book Of The People: how to read the bible (A.N.Wilson)

Asteroid Hunters (Carrie Nugent)

Glaxo (Hernán Ronsino)

The Good Earth (Pearl S.Buck, ill.Nick Bertozzi)

Lord Of The Flies (William Golding)

Who Are You Really? the surprising puzzle of personality (Brian R.Little)

The Blue Fox (Sjón)

Vile Bodies (Evelyn Waugh)

Sputnik Sweetheart (Haruki Murakami)

Welcome To The Monkey House (Kurt Vonnegut)

Shenzhen: a travelogue from china (Guy Delisle)

The Crucible (Arthur Miller)

The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg (Mark Twain)

The Abolition Of Man (C.S.Lewis)

The Snow Queen (Hans Christian Anderson)

The Fir Tree (Hans Christian Anderson)

Dracula (Bram Stoker)

The Last Temptation (Neil Gaiman, Michael Zulli & Alice Cooper)

Stories Of Your Life and other stories (Ted Chiang)

Am I Alone Here? notes on living to read and reading to live (Peter Orner)

My Friend Dahmer (Derf Backderf)

Object Lessons: the paris review presents the art of the short story (various)

Believe Me (Eddie Izzard)

Dharma Bums (Jack Kerouac)

The Last Interview: Roberto Bolaño

The Last Interview: Ray Bradbury

The Last Interview: Jorge Luis Borges

 

Books Read, June 2017 (highly recommended books are in bold)

The Dinner Party and other stories (Joshua Ferris)

But What If We’re Wrong? thinking about the present as if it were the past(Chuck Klosterman)

Spork (Maclear & Arsenault)

Building The New American Economy: smart, fair & sustainable (Jonathan Sacks)

Writing In The Dark: essays on literature and politics (David Grossman)

I’m Just No Good At Rhyming: and other nonsense for mischievous kids and immature grown-ups (Chris Harris, illus.Lane Smith)

Color: a natural history of the palette (Victoria Finlay)

The Ballad Of The Sad Cafe and other stories(Carson McCullers)

Stay Where You Are, Then Leave (John Boyne)

Asteroid Hunters (Carrie Nugent)

The Laughing Monsters (Denis Johnson)

The Good Earth (Pearl S.Buck, ill.Nick Bertozzi)

The Bricks That Built The Houses (Kate Tempest)

Glaxo (Hernán Ronsino)

Who Are You Really? the surprising puzzle of personality (Brian R.Little)

The Blue Fox (Sjón)

The Member Of The Wedding (Carson McCullers)

My Son, Mio (Astrid Lindgren)

Shenzhen: a travelogue from china (Guy Delisle)

The Abolition Of Man (C.S.Lewis)

The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg (Mark Twain)

The Snow Queen (Hans Christian Anderson)

The Fir Tree (Hans Christian Anderson)

 

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on July 5, 2017 in BOOKS

 

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152. Books Bought & Read, January 2017…

I know last blog I promised you a review of 2016, but as the legendary Douglas Adams famously said: “I love deadlines. I love the whooshing noise they make as they go by…

So that’ll be next month.

I read a large baker’s dozen of books this past month (14), but everywhere I turned I seemed to stumble across a treasure trove of Penguin Classic Deluxes, which I am slowly accumulating and which account for the elevated quantity of books in the Jane Austen and Louisa May Alcott wheelhouse, as well as the tally of 43 books acquired, (including two of the Brooklyn bard’s classic ‘Leaves Of Grass.’ Anybody looking for a spare copy? I just can’t help myself from buying beautiful books…)

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I discovered a new favourite author this January in Simon Rich, ripping through two collections of short stories by this New Yorker and Saturday Night Live writer, every one of which was rye, twisted and hilarious.

Don’t let the fact that he looks 12 years old put you off: go out and read something by him, now.

(Here you go: I’ll even get you started with one).

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I gave my nod to NY history by finishing the mammoth biography of the richest man in modern times, John D.Rockefeller (Sr.), and refreshed my scientific curiosity with the short and sweetly written ‘The Ten Most Beautiful Scientific Experiments,’ a blend of history and explanation of the magical universe I greatly enjoyed.

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That set me up to read the equally delightful ‘The Pattern On The Stone,’ a simplified explanation of the theory behind computers. Terrified I would be inundated with complicated jargon and incomprehensible technical maps, this exploration of the core concepts of logic and information storage may not help me to create an iPad from scratch after the inevitable apocalypse, but was a fascinating and highly accessible read nonetheless.

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Miranda July continues to be one of my favourite people, and I finally got hold of a copy of her unclassifiable ‘It Chooses You,’ a masterclass in procrastination in which she visits, interviews and photos strangers advertising things for sale in a local newspaper which she has absolutely no intention of buying. Truly bizarre, and a little hypnotic.

A lot like this video of hers…

And, after reading two award winning novels last month, I eventually read 2016’s Booker Prize Winner, ‘The Sellout,’ in which Paul Beatty sets off from the starter’s pistol at pace and never lets up. A coiled, compact tale of race relations and twisted stereotypes packed with endless, streaming wordplay, I can’t believe it took me this long to read it.

You shouldn’t wait, either.

Books Bought, January 2017

Leaves Of Grass (Walt Whitman) x2

Privacy (Garret Keizer)

An Anthropologist On Mars (Oliver Sacks)

I Like You: hospitality under the influence (Amy Sedaris)

The Great War: july 1, 1916: the first day of the battle of the somme (Joe Sacco)

McSweeney’s No.23

On Argentina (Jorge Luis Borges)

Lonely Planet: colombia

Lonely Planet: iceland

Songs Of The Garden (Utamaro)

Twelve Years A Slave (Solomon Northup)

One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (Ken Kesey)

It Chooses You (Miranda July)

Bat-Manga! the secret history of batman in japan (Chip Kidd & Geoff Spear)

Ronin (Frank Miller)

The $100 Startup: reinvent the way you make a living, do what you love, and make a new future (Chris Guillebeau)

Top 10 New Orleans (Dorling Kingsley)

Pride And Prejudice (Jane Austen)

The Polysyllabic Spree (Nick Hornby)

Shakespeare Wrote For Money (Nick Hornby)

Housework Vs.The Dirt Nick Hornby)

More Baths, Less Talking (Nick Hornby)

Today Will Be Different (Maria Semple)

The Mark And The Void (Paul Murray)

Islam (Karen Armstrong)

The Broom Of The System (David Foster Wallace)

The Strange Library (Haruki Murakami)

Fooling Houdini: magaicians, mentalists, math geeks, and the hidden powers of the mind (Alex Stone)

Little Women (Louisa May Alcott)

Emma (Jane Austen)

The Narrow Road To The Deep North and other travel sketches (Bashô)

The Gospel Of Wealth: essays and other writings (Andrew Carnegie)

The Empathy Exams (Leslie Jamison)

The Divine Within: selected writings on englightenment (Aldous Huxley)

ABC (Marion Bataille)

The Pale King (David Foster Wallace)

The Ministry Of Special Cases (Nathan Englander)

Being A Dog: following the dog into a world of smell (Alexandra Horowitz)

Writing In The Dark: essays on literature (David Grossman)

The Ten Most Beautiful Experiments (George Johnson)

Collected Essays (Arthur Miller)

Presence: collected stories (Arthur Miller)

 

Books Read, January 2017 (Books in bold are highly recommended)

The Jaguar Smile: a nicaraguan journey (Salman Rushdie)

Spoiled Brats (Simon Rich)

A Book Of Penguin (various)

The Sellout (Paul Beatty)

The Pattern On The Stone: the simple ideas that make computers work (W.Daniel Hillis)

The Last Girlfriend On Earth: and other love stories (Simon Rich)

Hallucinations (Oliver Sacks)

Titan: the life of john d.rockefeller, sr. (Ron Chernow)

The Geography Of Genius: a search for the world’s most creative places (Eric Weiner)

Privacy (Garret Keizer)

It Chooses You (Miranda July)

The Ten Most Beautiful Experiments (George Johnson)

Scepticism Inc. (Bo Fowler)

The Broom Of The System (David Foster Wallace)

 
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Posted by on February 10, 2017 in BOOKS

 

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