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157. Books Bought & Read, June 2017…

157. Books Bought & Read, June 2017…

In ‘Willpower,’ the fascinating study of that illusive character trait which I have in abundance when it comes to alcohol and not at all when it comes to purchasing books, Baumeister and Tierney discuss how strict diets can set the average weight watcher up for failure as, once you transgress your self-imposed limits once, it often leads to the food floodgates opening.

The bibliographic equivalent befell me this month.

Willpower

Since last month, I have made a vague effort to not read at least as many books as I buy, and with a week to go I was a couple of copies ahead of my purchasing potential.

And then I visited my friend Chris at the Central Park Strand Stand, and all the month’s good work was undone.

So it didn’t seem worthwhile holding back anymore, and I emerged later that (hot, humid, New York) afternoon from the mythical underground East Village Books and Records with three as-yet unowned editions of the Last Interview series (all B’s, bizarrely: Bolaño, Bradbury and my beloved Borges), as well as a second Kerouac of the month, (not bad for an author I’m pretty sure I dislike, but when Penguin decides to include him in their Classic Deluxe Editions, what’s a collector to do?!)

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So, 33 bought, 23 read, and a new written dietary regime begins afresh in July.

Frustratingly, in an effort to hurriedly rebalance the scales, I ended up reading a book I HAD ALREADY READ. Denis Johnson is an incredible, versatile author, and ‘The Laughing Monsters,’ his short tale of passion, betrayal and spies in Africa, may have been equally fun the second time around, but there are too many books in the universe, (or on my bookshelves, even), for me to read books twice. Fie.

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I was depressed by Joshua Ferris’s wonderfully bleak short story collection ‘The Dinner Party‘, (his debut novel, ‘Then We Came To The End,’ is still one of my favourites of the past few years); thought-provoked by Klosterman’s challenging ‘But What If We’re Wrong?’ (with its ingenious, OCD-infuriatingly upside-down cover); and discovered a new author when I finally read some Carson McCullers short stories, and went straight back to the shelf to wolf down her ‘ The Member Of The Wedding.

Nothing much happens in this lilting, Southern tale, but it fails to happen in such gorgeously described detail, and features a kind of female Catcher In The Rye, (as I saw the main character described), which makes for a wonderful reading experience.

But if there is one theme to last month’s reading, it is: beautiful editions.

Naturally, there were a few more informative TED talks , and I finally started in on the small corner of sweet, red-bound New York Review of Books kids series I have tucked away, (with a bizarre and bizarrely dark tale by Astrid Lindgren,), but it was the equally Scandewegian, equally fairy taley H.C.Anderson who provided the most beautiful bindings for my shelf.

Ten Speed Press released stunning, cloth-bound editions of two Anderson tales, (the puzzling ‘The Fir Tree‘ and the deeply disturbing ‘The Snow Queen‘), with illustrations from neighbouring Finn (and contender for Most Melodic Name Of All Time Award) Sanna Annukka. They were originally intended as presents for my (newly) 8-year-old niece, but somehow haven’t found their way off my shelf yet.

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Luckily, the same can’t be said for probably my favourite book this past month: ‘I’m Just No Good At Rhyming,’  from TV comedy writer Chris Harris. Within half a dozen pages I was a kid again, (not that it takes much…) reading Michael Rosen and Dr.Seuss and Shel Silverstein, and laughing out loud perhaps more than a 39-year-old should at a kids book of poems.

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Harris and illustrator Lane Smith make full use of page space, visual gags, comedy callbacks, and surrealism, sprinkled with just the right amount of not-too-much emotion to produce a work I was more than happy to present to my equally delighted niece.

Mainly because I had two copies.

 

 

Books Bought, June 2017

Seiobo There Below (László Krasznahorkai)

The Sunset Limited (Cormac McCarthy)

The Ballad Of The Sad Cafe and other stories(Carson McCullers)

Americanah (Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie)

On The Road (Jack Kerouac)

The Wonderful O (James Thurber)

The Book Of The People: how to read the bible (A.N.Wilson)

Asteroid Hunters (Carrie Nugent)

Glaxo (Hernán Ronsino)

The Good Earth (Pearl S.Buck, ill.Nick Bertozzi)

Lord Of The Flies (William Golding)

Who Are You Really? the surprising puzzle of personality (Brian R.Little)

The Blue Fox (Sjón)

Vile Bodies (Evelyn Waugh)

Sputnik Sweetheart (Haruki Murakami)

Welcome To The Monkey House (Kurt Vonnegut)

Shenzhen: a travelogue from china (Guy Delisle)

The Crucible (Arthur Miller)

The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg (Mark Twain)

The Abolition Of Man (C.S.Lewis)

The Snow Queen (Hans Christian Anderson)

The Fir Tree (Hans Christian Anderson)

Dracula (Bram Stoker)

The Last Temptation (Neil Gaiman, Michael Zulli & Alice Cooper)

Stories Of Your Life and other stories (Ted Chiang)

Am I Alone Here? notes on living to read and reading to live (Peter Orner)

My Friend Dahmer (Derf Backderf)

Object Lessons: the paris review presents the art of the short story (various)

Believe Me (Eddie Izzard)

Dharma Bums (Jack Kerouac)

The Last Interview: Roberto Bolaño

The Last Interview: Ray Bradbury

The Last Interview: Jorge Luis Borges

 

Books Read, June 2017 (highly recommended books are in bold)

The Dinner Party and other stories (Joshua Ferris)

But What If We’re Wrong? thinking about the present as if it were the past(Chuck Klosterman)

Spork (Maclear & Arsenault)

Building The New American Economy: smart, fair & sustainable (Jonathan Sacks)

Writing In The Dark: essays on literature and politics (David Grossman)

I’m Just No Good At Rhyming: and other nonsense for mischievous kids and immature grown-ups (Chris Harris, illus.Lane Smith)

Color: a natural history of the palette (Victoria Finlay)

The Ballad Of The Sad Cafe and other stories(Carson McCullers)

Stay Where You Are, Then Leave (John Boyne)

Asteroid Hunters (Carrie Nugent)

The Laughing Monsters (Denis Johnson)

The Good Earth (Pearl S.Buck, ill.Nick Bertozzi)

The Bricks That Built The Houses (Kate Tempest)

Glaxo (Hernán Ronsino)

Who Are You Really? the surprising puzzle of personality (Brian R.Little)

The Blue Fox (Sjón)

The Member Of The Wedding (Carson McCullers)

My Son, Mio (Astrid Lindgren)

Shenzhen: a travelogue from china (Guy Delisle)

The Abolition Of Man (C.S.Lewis)

The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg (Mark Twain)

The Snow Queen (Hans Christian Anderson)

The Fir Tree (Hans Christian Anderson)

 

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on July 5, 2017 in BOOKS

 

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154. Books Bought & Read, March 2017…

154. Books Bought & Read, March 2017…

March 2017 saw me pad my early-season stats with a bingo-esque 44 books bought, 26 read.

I was almost neck-and-neck in my buying:reading ratio last month until, perhaps getting a little cocky, I visited my old friend Chris at the Central Park Strand Stand for the first time in weeks, (walking away eight books heavier, mainly the colourful edition of Vonnegut novels I have decided to re-collect all of his novels in), and found a small treasure trove of food-based books during my last shift at the Housing Works charity bookstore where I am now struggling to find time to volunteer.

The reason for both of these last facts, (kitchen reading and lack of time), is that I found myself accidentally getting a new job this month. This weekend I became a fully trained tour guide for the oldest (and the best!) food tasting tour company in NYC, the wonderful Foods of New York Tours. If you want to be led around Greenwich Village and fed by me, both literally and informationally, get in touch!

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Until those tours, and a side project I have working at a small, plucky startup company called Apple kick in properly next month, I am reading as much as possible, from an advance copy on the science behind ‘Flavo(u)r’ (did you know foods can taste better depending on the colour or weight of the plate?) to the ever-informative Michael Pollan on how cooking makes us more human, (and apparently the Netflix series isn’t too bad, either).

I cleansed my palette with a surprisingly heavy diet of death…and comic books.

I found a two small collections of final thoughts from two perennial thought-provokers, (Oliver Sacks and Christopher Hitchens), and Neil Gaiman’s fun and fierce retelling of Norse Mythology kind of fit right in, as the gods go around killing whomsoever they want, (and often being killed themselves…for a while). It seems unfair that Neil Gaiman not only writes so wonderfully, but gets the most stunning covers: the 3D-feeling MjölnirHammer of Thor, making for a stunning image on the front of his latest collection of tales.

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I was excited to finally read some James Baldwin, after seeing the wonderful documentary on him last month, and both Ted Talk books lived up to previous expectations, especially the one on architecture, but the surprise find of the month came from a sliver of a book which caught my eye due to its author, (not that Andy Kaufman, it turned out…)

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‘All My Friends Are Superheroes’ was a wonderfully witty, wryly romantic, hipster-nerd romcom of a tale, and if you don’t feel like buying it you could probably read it in half an hour in the bookshop.

Just don’t tell them I sent you…

Books Bought, March 2017

The Fire Next Time (James Baldwin)

Peanuts: the art of charles m.schultz (ed.Chip Kidd)

Dig If You Will The Picture: funk, sex, god and genius in the music of prince (Ben Greenman) x2

Know This: today’s most interesting and important scientific ideas, discoveries, and developments (ed.John Brockman)

X: a highly specific, defiantly incomplete history of the early 21st century (Chuck Klosterman)

The Adventures Of John Blake: mystery of the ghost ship (Philip Pullman & Fred Fordham)

H Is For Hawk (Helen MacDonald)

When Breath Becomes Air (Paul Kalanithi)

The Schooldays Of Jesus (J.M.Coetzee)

Tears We Cannot Stop (Michael Eric Dyson)

Absolutely On Music (Haruki Murakami & Seiji Ozawa)

The Fireside Grown-Up Guide To The Midlife Crisis (Jason Hazeley & Joel Morris)

The Fireside Grown-Up Guide To The Hipster (Jason Hazeley & Joel Morris)

Not My Father’s Son (Alan Cumming)

McSweeney’s No.5

Flash Boys (Michael Lewis)

Go Tell It On The Mountains (James Baldwin)

All My Friends Are Superheroes (Andrew Kaufman)

How To Make Books (Esther K.Smith)

Make Trouble (John Waters)

Tales Of Ancient Egypt (Roger Lancelyn Green)

Universal: a guide to the cosmos (Brian Cox & Jeff Forshaw)

The Global Novel: writing the world in the 21st century (Adam Kirsch)

Garlic And Sapphires: the secret life of a critic in disguise (Ruth Reichl)

Flavor: the science of our most neglected sense (Bob Holmes)

Selected Poems (Edna St.Vincent Millay)

Revolution For Dummies: laughing through the arab spring (Bassem Youssef)

The Village: 400 years of beats and bohemians, radicals and rogues, a history of greenwich village (John Strasbaugh)

The Last Unicorn (Peter S.Beagle)

How To Talk To Girls At Parties (Neil Gaiman, Gabriel Bá & Fábio Moon)

The Essex Serpent (Sarah Perry)

The Food And Wine Of France: eating and drinking from champagne to provence (Edward Behr)

The Beats: a graphic history (Harvey Pekar et al)

In The Land Of Invented Languages: adventures in linguistic creativity, madness, and genius (Arika Okrent)

Home And Away: writing the beautiful game (Karl Ove Knausgaard & Fredrik Ekelund)

An Abbreviated Life (Ariel Leve)

Bluebeard (Kurt Vonnegut)

Mother Night (Kurt Vonnegut)

Sirens Of Titan (Kurt Vonnegut)

David Boring (Daniel Clowes)

The Last Interview (Lou Reed)

The New York Stories (John O’Hara)

You, Too, Could Write A Poem (David Orr)

111 Shops In New York That You Must Not Miss: unique finds and local treasures (Susan Lusk & Mark Gabor)

 

Books Read, March 2017 (Recommended books in bold)

Moving To Higher Ground: how jazz can change your life (Wynton Marsalis)

The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen: century – 1969 (Alan Moore & Kevin O’Neill)

Why We Work (Barry Schwartz)

Patience (Daniel Clowes)

The Art Of Stillness: adventures in going nowhere (Pico Iyer)

Gratitude (Oliver Sacks)

Mortality (Christopher Hitchens)

Norse Mythology (Neil Gaiman)

Peanuts: the art of charles m.schultz (ed.Chip Kidd)

The Adventures Of John Blake: mystery of the ghost ship (Philip Pullman & Fred Fordham)

Museum Legs: fatigue and hope in the face of art (Amy Whitaker)

Bat-Manga! the secret history of batman in japan (ed.Chip Kidd)

The Fireside Grown-Up Guide To The Midlife Crisis (Jason Hazeley & Joel Morris)

The Fireside Grown-Up Guide To The Hipster (Jason Hazeley & Joel Morris)

The Future Of Architecture In 100 Buildings (Mark Kushner)

All My Friends Are Superheroes (Andrew Kaufman)

Islam: a short history (Karen Armstrong)

The Fire Next Time (James Baldwin)

Cooked: a natural history of transformation (Michael Pollan)

A Grief Observed (C.S.Lewis)

Make Trouble (John Waters)

The Global Novel: writing the world in the 21st century (Adam Kirsch)

Flavor: the science of our most neglected sense (Bob Holmes)

How To Talk To Girls At Parties (Neil Gaiman, Gabriel Bá & Fábio Moon)

Garlic And Sapphires: the secret life of a critic in disguise (Ruth Reichl)

The Beats: a graphic history (Harvey Pekar et al)

 
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Posted by on April 4, 2017 in BOOKS

 

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